Perennials usually take two years to get into flower; however, Mr Fothergill’s have a selection of seed which flower in the first year. Trials manager Brian Talman told Ken Crowther how they have working to develop a range of seeds which are fool proof.



Well known dahlia grower Dave Gilham has diversified and has taken up growing daffodils. For the past three years he’s been growing the garden bulbs and last year won a National Trophy class in 2016 with 12 flowers. He will be trying to win again this year as he told Ken Crowther.


Your garden is a demanding beast which stops for no one

Your garden is a demanding beast which stops for no one

I hope that all are well rested and have enjoyed this summer and have had a chance to get away and relax?  However, as you all know the garden is a demanding beast and I’m afraid won’t stop for anyone!  This summer has seen some rather hot and balmy days and also the odd thunder storm, playing havoc with watering duties.  Only just the other day I was watering tubs and containers in the rain!  It just wasn’t enough to rely on mother nature; I had to boost the supplies.  That aside, other than watering and liquid feeding on a regular basis, there are just a few other jobs that shouldn’t be left too long.

This is the perfect time to look through the myriad of seed and bulb catalogues streaming through the post for colour ideas this autumn and importantly early next year.  Don’t just look out for decorative interest, which is important, but sometimes so is disease resistance especially for any edibles.  With perennials I’m also looking for those plants that are self-supporting  –  I just don’t want to deal with link stakes or canes everywhere.

One of the things I love to do is grow on lilies in pots and secrete them in the bed and borders as a form of successional bedding.  They’re ideal for giving height, instant colour and scent by the bucket load, however, once blooms have faded, they need to be removed and popped at the back of the garden to die down naturally; don’t forget to water though and feed to enrich the bulb for next years display.

Grow lilies in pots and put them into beds and borders

Grow lilies in pots and put them into beds and borders

Unfortunately you now have gaps…what’s to do?  Why not plant up slightly taller pots with perennials such as Rudbeckia, Echinacea and or varieties of grasses.  All of these flower well, but also improve with age…don’t we all!

Rudbeckia and Echinacea have fab flowers, but have even better autumn and winter colour with their superb deep black seed heads – very striking.  Grasses, on the other hand, produce flowers that are almost everlasting plus have foliage that colours well as it ages (they don’t need to be cut down until February next year). Doing this will extend the season of interest and keep your garden a talking point with friends and family.

Start to collect seed from plants.  Recently I collected spent flower stalks of Aquilegia vulgaris (columbine).  Harvest them carefully, because as soon as you touch the stems the seed falls.  Cut flower stems down to the base of plant or to an outward facing leaf and turn carefully into a large paper bag… and let nature take its own course.  Once seed has dropped sieve to separate any coatings etc from the seed.  Once complete seed can be stored in a clean envelope, labelled and dated, and stored in a frost free dry place.  Believe it or not I use the fridge, as long as its around 5°C (41°F), as this will ensure that viability is retained for as long as possible.  Use as and when required.  Aquilegia can be sown fresh in seed trays and left in cold frames or kept away from over exposed areas.  Sometimes they germinate early, if so keep them moist, NOT saturated, and allow them to grow on for at least ½ year.  This will enable a more stocky plant to develop.  Pot up and grow on for another ½ year before setting out into the ground.  Failing this you can also sow in February.  Plants will be ready to be move on early/ late summer.

Check out this RHS link to collecting, storing and sowing a range of seed https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=675

I can’t believe it another year has gone by and we have started another academic year at Writtle University College – notice the name change?

Check out the college web site for a full update www.writtle.ac.uk

If you’re looking to update your knowledge and skills or wishing to pursue a career  in horticulture give the team a call on 01245 424200.  Alternatively, come and chat with us anytime.  Check out this link for further details http://writtle.ac.uk/Information-Events

Good luck and happy gardening!

For any gardening tips why not contact Tom Cole, Senior Horticultural Lecturer, Writtle College, Chelmsford, CM1 3RR by post (including a SAE) or by email at tom.cole@writtle.ac.uk


It is best to water first thing in the morning and later in the day

It is best to water first thing in the morning and later in the day

Goodness, as I write this, it’s hot out there!  Having watered already earlier today…I’m at it again, especially with my tomatoes, peppers and fruit bushes. Best to water first thing and again at the end of the day, hopefully standing pots on saucers or trays to try and keep as much water around the base of the pot. I usually water at the end of the day as this is great for reducing evaporation.  However, if a plant looks like it’s wilting and suffering from drought in the day, then water it immediately.

Using the right amount of water is the most important aspect of a plant’s survival in dry conditions. Bear in mind that it is not just hot weather that can cause soil to dry out, windy weather can also have a detrimental effect.  Try to avoid watering plant leaves in direct sunlight because they can become scorched, particularly when they have hairy foliage. Why not, if you haven’t already, install a water butt in the garden to conserve water.

For those of you enjoying yourselves away from home it’s worth investing in an automatic watering system with a timer, adjust it to take hot and dry weather into account. I’d also move container plants into the shade if you are going away on holiday and no one is watering your plants; your plants will thank you for it.

If you’ve got trees and shrubs that have been planted in the last couple of years on lawns or in areas of rough grass have a circle of clear earth around them – this must be kept clear or grass will prevent essential moisture getting through. Mulching with bark or compost will help.

Elsewhere in the garden consider cutting back early flowering plants such as foxgloves, snapdragons, lupins and penstemons as they go over, cut back just those sections of the flower spike that have faded, taking care to leave any secondary laterals that may be growing. You may get a second flush of flowers. Others worth doing this to are those lovely, fragrant catmints, hardy geraniums and any hellebore that escaped an early prune. With hellebores, as you cut back flower spikes, take a look at the base of the plant for seedlings. Don’t lift them now; come back in the autumn and pop them on into 9cm pots using a soil based compost such as John Innes Potting Compost No. 2. Grow them on by the back of the house, in a cold frame or unheard greenhouse and planting out next spring.

Lastly, be safe in the sun

It’s not only plants that can start to flag in dry weather, if you are working in the garden in hot conditions, it is important to take the following precautions:

  • wear suntan lotion or sun block and top up often
  • work in the shade if possible, out of direct sunlight
  • wear a hat or headscarf…they’re all the rage at the moment
  • take regular breaks and have frequent non-alcoholic drinks

Good luck and happy gardening!

For any gardening tips why not contact Tom Cole, Senior Horticultural Lecturer, Writtle College, Chelmsford, CM1 3RR by post (including a SAE) or by email at tom.cole@writtle.ac.uk