It’s the gorgeous portfolio of gardens from stately acres to inner city spaces that makes the National Garden Scheme such a national treasure.

The beautiful hillside garden at Riverhill Himalayan Gardens has been privately owned by the Rogers family since 1840. Join owner Sarah Rogers for a leisurely visit through the history and planting of the gardens with its extensive views across the Weald of Kent, spectacular rhododendrons, azaleas and fine specimen trees.

There’s so much to explore as the family continue to uncover the garden’s beautiful structure and a couple of other surprises besides!

For more virtual garden visits do take a look at the NGS website – https://ngs.org.uk/virtual-garden-visits-collection/


Cae Newydd on the Isle of Anglesey is an informal country garden with outstanding panoramic views out to Snowdonia.

The Garden Owners, Hazel and Nigel Bond started work on the garden in 2002 when it was nothing more than open pastures. Today the garden is abundant with lush, colourful planting, offering a haven for their local wildlife.

Join Hazel for a walk through the garden to learn the story behind this Welsh garden gem…

For more virtual garden visits do take a look at the NGS website – https://ngs.org.uk/virtual-garden-visits-collection/


Garden owner Patsy Clark is 93, born the same year that the National Garden Scheme was founded she has been a fabulous supporter of the charity for over 37 years. Opening the garden, she says, gives her impetus to get it ship-shape. Join her now for a virtual visit to her Hexham garden that’s painted with a plantswoman’s palette and packed with character.

“All my plants are people,” she says. “I either love them or I don’t.”

For more virtual garden visits do take a look at the NGS website – https://ngs.org.uk/virtual-garden-visits-collection/


In 1911 Ludo and May Heathcoat Amory, the current owners great grandparents, married and moved into the house at Chevithorne Barton in Devon. The garden was very much part of their future plans but within four years Ludo was dead on the Somme and, when she lost all three sons in the second World War, May poured her passion into the garden creating a plantswoman’s paradise. Woodland walks carpeted with bluebells, orchards, rock gardens and cascades, herbaceous borders, a lake and stunning views over the Exe Valley would seem special enough. But May’s legacy continued with her grandson, Michael, who dedicated himself to creating a National Collection of Oaks.

Today, Chevithorne Barton is lived in by May’s great grandson Edward who, together with Bluebell the dog, takes us on an enchanting virtual tour of the garden:

For more virtual garden visits do take a look at the NGS website – https://ngs.org.uk/virtual-garden-visits-collection/


The reputation of Philippa Burrough’s stunning Essex garden grows from year to year; recently it was voted one of the country’s top 100 gardens to visit by Garden News magazine.

Hardly surprising giving the ravishing plant combinations she arranges in the different beds and borders which have the mellow house and farm buildings as their picturesque backdrop.

In particular, at this time of year the listed black barns enclose a stunning display of tulips in the old farmyard that is colour coordinated, skilfully mixed with perennials and neatly enclosed with low clipped hedging.

For more virtual garden visits do take a look at the NGS website – https://ngs.org.uk/virtual-garden-visits-collection/